Filed under Pilot Project

Robert Hendry

He works within a lot of fields, but I picked out his dereliction works due to his eye on texture and colour within the decay… I think they are quite beautiful. Something I will definitely take into my own work! http://roberthendry.co.uk/galleries/dereliction

Kevin Bauman

Bauman has done various projects, some on lightening and the skyline, and another on churches. My favourite work is his 100 Abandoned Houses project, each one taken the same from the front of the house, take a look on his site … http://www.kevinbauman.com/

Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Photographers from Paris who concentrate on dereliction, they have done projects called Theaters and the more famous Ruins of Detroit. Their website is http://www.marchandmeffre.com/index.html

Mark Blundell

Blundell doesn’t just work with abandoned buildings, he also works with modern buildings and has also done some work on street art. He works very heavily in post editing, which does give some interesting effects and makes his works individual. I do feel he takes away some of the natural beauty of the buildings by editing, but I’m impressed with his skills, here’s his site … http://markblundellphoto.com/

James Lester

Lester is one of the first derelict photographers I came across. I don’t know much about him and his photography, but I enjoy his photographs and love the textures and light he has caught within some of his images. This is his website … http://www.jameslesterphotography.co.uk/NEWindex.html

Dereliction Photography

As well as looking at old photography and the history of, I want to look at abandoned buildings and dereliction. I feel as though dereliction is an important part of history, just because it is decaying and falling apart doesn’t mean that there is nothing there to tell a story. The objects that are left behind can become an interesting factor within a photograph. The decay can give beautiful textures and colours and make what seems to be an abandoned ugly space look a lot more fascinating. There is always more than meets the eye…

Update

So… I’ve had a rubbish few weeks, been stressed and ill. Out of this though, I did get a better idea of what I’m doing!

I recently got into derelict photography (Well, apart from when I was doing my A-level project on it), and it’s got me really interested in the history of places Now my proposal for my Pilot project was on symmetry so obviously this doesn’t really fit in much, but if I alter from symmetry to space, I could still look at the shapes, but with a more specific reasoning.

A very old photographer called Henry Dixon took many photographs of London in the 1800’s, as well as all over the world. I’d love to go back to these places and see what they look like now.

 

Idea

After looking through the photographers and pictures I am interested in, it seems that I am attracted to the textures and shape of the space. I’d be quite interested to look at how these buildings are shaping the country, as I always think of the UK as quite a historical place with all its old buildings. For instance, is London changing to a modern capital like many others, or is it still being seen as historical…?

With new generations, the new and modern is all they know, so it seems fitting that the city is becoming modernised to attract them, but what about our heritage and all the history there. It is disappearing?